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Welcome to the website of the Navarre church of Christ

This church is patterned after the one you read about in the New Testament. It has no creed except the New Testament, no head except Jesus Christ, no organization other than that described in the Scriptures, and no political agenda except the proclamation of the Kingdom of the Son of God. We are not a denomination since no denominations were ever heard of in New Testament times. The worship here is centered upon the Scriptures and involves only those things authorized by the Lord and His apostles in the New Testament. You will not find innovations designed to appeal to the flesh and pride, or that tend to the exaltation of man. If you are looking to learn about Jesus Christ and become His disciple, we invite you to come learn with us.


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What Must I Do to be Saved?

The most important question man will ever ask is: What must I do to be saved? The ramifications of the answer given are eternal. Therefore, it is imperative one allows the author of man's salvation (Hebrews 5:9) to give the answer. God has provided man with everything he needs in relationship to life and godliness (2 Peter 1:3). This knowledge comes through the Bible, which is His inspired Word (2 Timothy 3:16). Since all Scripture is inspired, whether spoken by the prophets of the Old Testament (Hebrews 1:1), Jesus (Hebrews 1:2), or the apostles (John 16:13), one must use all of Scripture to find the answer. No new revelations from God have come since the Bible was completed (Jude 1:3; Revelation 22:18-19). Therefore, the Bible is the only source of information qualified to tell man what he must do to be saved. Since the same inspired Word is to be the standard by which man is judged on the last day (John 12:48), it is the final word on man's salvation.

What does the Bible say in answer to the question, "What must I do to be saved?"
Entire Issue of November 18, 2018


"The Gates of Hell Shall Not Prevail Against It"

In the first ever mention of the church, the Lord said to Peter that He would build it and the "gates of hell shall not prevail against it" (Matt. 16.18).

These are some of the most picturesque words in all of scripture, but they are also loaded with meaning and comfort.

Gates throughout ancient history have been associated with the power of the city they protected. They were the means of entrance and exit, a place of counsel, and where armies exited to conduct war and entered afterward either in victory or defeat. The bigger the gates, the more prestige and power the king behind them supposedly possessed. And as we consider the seemingly innumerable members of Satan's followers, both spiritual and earthly, we are tempted to fear and forget this promise of our Lord (Matt 7.13-14).
Entire Issue of November 4, 2018


All Those Who Obey Him

Lowell Sallee

("he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him" Hebrews 5:9)

God the Father's Part: Grace. "For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God" (Ephesians 2:8). God the Father's part in man's salvation might be summed up in the word grace (favor of God). Man did not deserve to be saved, however, God's grace has been extended to us (the whole world) that we might be saved. "For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men" (Titus 2:11).
Entire Issue of October 21, 2018


Modest Apparel?

Bobby Graham (The Gospel Guardian, July 16, 1970)

The problem of which Christians are probably more conscious now than any other, is that of dress. Most recognize it to be an issue, but few are really aware of the principles involved. Many who once decried such wanton disregard for the will of the Lord and the consciences of others apparently now have little concern. The violations sometimes result from a lack of teaching, but more often they are the fruit of an unwillingness to accept what the Book teaches. Many who claim to be the Lord's people hearken more willingly to the call of style than to the voice of the Good Shepherd. Instead of setting examples to enlighten a sin-darkened world, most follow the trends that lead into darkness. Surely the Lord has spoken on this subject that attracts us: will we not listen?
Entire Issue of October 7, 2018


Made to be Sin

by Doy Moyer

Sometimes I am struck with the beauty of a passage while, at the same time, humbled by the fact that its fullness and depth is out of my reach. The passage becomes a never-ending source of thought, ideas, and encouragement.

Such is the case for me with 2 Corinthians 5:21 — "For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God."

Who can understand the depths of this? Who can explain all that this passage sums up? I cannot. Even so, I often dwell on it, seeking to know and understand more of what it says. So brief a passage packs more power than I can fathom.
Entire Issue of September 23, 2018


Why Do People Turn Back?

Irvin Himmel

Paul asked the Galatians, "But now that you have come to know God, or rather to be known by God, how is it that you turn back again to the weak and worthless elemental things, to which you desire to be enslaved all over again?" (Galatians 4:9, NASB.) It is absurd for men who have breathed freedom through the gospel to fall back to a system which enslaves the soul, whether Judaism, heathenism, denominationalism, or worldliness.

Why do people who have known the Lord in the forgiveness of sins allow themselves to slip back into their old way of life? Some turn back not long after they are baptized; others serve God for years before drifting away from the truth. What are the reasons?
Entire Issue of September 9, 2018


The Nature & Character of the New Covenant

by Larry Ray Hafley

Noting and quoting Jeremiah 31:31-34, the Hebrew writer (we will assume it was the apostle Paul) said:

Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah: Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt; because they continued not in my covenant, and I regarded them not, saith the Lord. For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people: and they shall not teach every man his neighbor, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest. For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their iniquities will I remember no more. In that he saith, A new covenant, he hath made the first old. Now that which decayeth and waxeth old is ready to vanish away (Heb. 8:8-13).

Some are confused by Paul's statement that the old covenant was "ready to vanish away."
Entire Issue of August 26, 2018


Gospel? Or Gimmickry?

“Preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort, with great patience and instruction. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but wanting to have their ears tickled, they will accumulate for themselves teachers in accordance to their own desires, and will turn away their ears from the truth and will turn aside to fables” (2 Timothy 4:2-4).

These verses clearly indicate that there are times when gospel preaching is in season and out of season. History indicates the same. In the first century in most places it was in season; in the middle ages it was out of season. There was a thrilling season for the gospel in middle America in the early nineteenth century, while at the same time it was largely out of season in France and Europe.
Entire Issue of August 12, 2018


A Lying Tongue

Imagine for a moment something that completely disgusts you. Something that makes you feel repulsed and offended. It may be something physical like a corrosive disease, or moral like an abusive crime. You know the feeling –that feeling of being so sickened that you unintentionally furrow your brow and frown from distaste. Have you thought of something yet?

Have you ever wondered what makes God feel that way? I suppose we could say that all sin causes a proverbial furrowing of His brow and frown on His face, but in Proverbs 6 we find a distinct list of sins that are an absolute abomination to Him. Among all the sins which one is capable of committing, these things are listed among those that totally repulse God. Proverbs 6:16-19 is where we find this list, and amongst these horribly repulsive acts against God we find what might come as a surprise. There the writer of Proverbs says this: “These six things the LORD hates, Yes, seven are an abomination to Him: a proud look, a lying tongue, hands that shed innocent blood…” (Prov. 6:16-17, NKJV). When reading this list, I find it to be much different than I would expect. My list would likely include things much more, as I would see it, consequential. But what is it about this list that comes as a surprise?
Entire Issue of July 29, 2018


What Has Happened to Ethics in Our Vulgar Age?

by Dennis Abernathy

Robert Fitch, Philosopher of Ethics, is quoted by Ravi Zacharias in The Harvard Veritas Forum as follows:

“Ours is an age where ethics has become obsolete. It is superseded by science, deleted by psychology, dismissed as emotive by philosophy. It is drowned in compassion, evaporates into aesthetics, and retreats before relativism.

The usual moral distinctions between good and bad are simply drowned in a model and emotion in which we feel more sympathy for the murderer than for the murdered, for the adulterer than for the betrayed, and in which we have begun to believe that the real guilty party, the one who somehow caused it all, is the victim and not the perpetrator of the crime.”

Vulgarity is becoming the norm in society among young and old, male and female. Cussing is becoming very much mainstream! Expletives, once banned in public discourse, are now increasingly turning up in literature, television, the news media and political speech. A recent study by Parents Research Council found the use of profanity during the so-called “family hour” (8:00 to 9:00 Eastern Time) is up fifty-eight percent from two years ago. And the nature of the language (e.g., sexual explicitness) is getting qualitatively worse. William Barclay wrote: “There can never have been a time in history when so much filthy language is used as it is today. And the tragedy is that today there are many people who have become so habituated to unclean talk that they are unaware that they are using it.” These comments were written nearly fifty years ago. If such was the case then, what is it now?

I don’t know about you, but I still believe profanity is profane and that certain words should not be used in everyday, public discourse. I still believe that higher standards of communication correlate with higher standards of behavior. But we are being told that such profanity and vulgarity does not signal a decline in manners or morals, but, that it’s all about “individualism” and “self-expression.” We are told that we should be happy, because the violation of norms gives people greater permission to express what they feel and how they feel it. Now, I’m all for expressing yourself, but if you want to express yourself, relying on vulgarity, obscenity and profanity is not a good way to do it! If the way I express how I feel and why I feel it is vulgar, obscene, and profane, then my moral standard has declined!
Entire Issue of July 15, 2018


Signs, Providence and Chance

By Edward Bragwell

The difference between miraculous and providential events is a topic of discussion for many Christians. We often have difficulty understanding how God can be active in the day by day affairs of this world without performing miracles. Likewise, we find it hard to grasp the idea of God granting a request for a specific temporal blessing without performing a miracle.

Because of this dilemma, some are prone to shout “it’s a miracle” when they see any natural wonder. A person survives a horrific airplane or automobile crash – “it’s a miracle.” Or, one falls 100 feet on to a concrete pavement, receiving only superficial wounds – “it’s a miracle that he was not killed.” Or, one is seriously ill, the doctors are doing their best, yet little or no noticeable improvement. Prayers are offered, the patient begins feeling better and is pronounced completely well – in about two weeks or so – “it’s a miracle.”
Entire Issue of May 13, 2018


Payment for Righteousness

“A laborer is worthy of his hire” (Luke 10:7). In this passage Jesus is describing how 70 disciples were to go to various cities and teach. Among other suggestions, Jesus told them to eat what they would be provided, not look around for the best meal.

Jesus presented a more detailed look at the value of labor in Matthew 20:1-16.

He relates the parable of the harvest, in which a man who owned a vineyard went out early in the morning to hire people to harvest his crop. He may have had a ready supply of workers who only needed to be told to work, or he may have approached a group of men whom today we might call day laborers. He agreed that he would pay each a penny a day and the men went to work.
Entire Issue of April 29, 2018


Evidence Eviscerating Evolution

Do you recall the classic image of supposed advances in evolution of man? At the side of the drawing is a fish, which comes onto land and grows legs, then becomes a bent-over apelike creature, eventually turning into an upright Homo sapien?

This fabricated time-line represents the supposed biologic evolution of man, starting with a small, simple creature and advancing in complexity to an alleged highest form of animal. It is accepted in scientific circles as a graphical representation, if not accurate in minor details, and is presented as scientific proof of the theory of evolution.

In fact, this is someone’s guess as to how evolution proceeded. In the same fashion, physical recreations of what animals looked like are largely based on guesses. We have valid evidence via fossilized bones of some portions of various creatures and with care experts can assemble those fossils (or casts of the fossils) into a partial representation of creatures. But skin, hair and other visual aspects of external features are even more guesswork than that drawing we spoke of earlier.
Entire Issue of April 15, 2018


Distracted Living

It is commonplace today that people are distracted in their everyday activities. Much of that distraction is driven by modern technology – wireless devices that can be used anywhere, from sitting at home to behind the wheel of a car (we hear regularly of “distracted driving”) to walking down the street (termed “distracted walking”). And because that distracting behavior can disrupt others’ lives, the distracted people are criticized, sometimes unjustly but sometimes deservedly.

Distraction is not a new phenomenon. Once upon a time, when automobiles did not automatically come with amenities such as radios and heaters, it was not uncommon that drivers would not play the radio for fear of not hearing an approaching police or fire siren, or because their interest in the program might keep them from noticing a crossing pedestrian. (Multi-tasking was not a word or even much of a concept in those halcyon days.)

But distractions occurred long before automobiles were popular. In fact, the Bible recounts several examples of distractions among God’s people that resulted in sin.
Entire Issue of April 1, 2018


Did Jesus Take Away All Law?

In taking away the Law, did Jesus take away all law?

We are hearing a lot lately about how we, living under the dispensation of Christ, are under grace and not under law. The implication being that Jesus died to free us from law – period – not merely the Mosaic law.

Much is made of the fact that, in many translations and manuscripts, the article, the, is not present. Hence the new dispensation is said to be one of grace without rules to be obeyed. It is alleged that our freedom in Christ is freedom for all law – any system containing commandments or rules to be observed.
Entire Issue of March 18, 2018


Your Favorite Hobby Horse

People often become stressed out in this modern world. They worry about making the car payments, paying the mortgage, feeding and clothing their children, doing a good job at work so they will be promoted or receive a raise.

They worry a lot about matters they can’t always control. They are concerned about political activities, the condition of wars around the world, whether a gunman will shoot up a school or a business, how much traffic exists on their way to and from work.

People, including Christians, become stressed about having stress.
Entire Issue of March 4, 2018


Differences in Worship - Then & Now Part 2

Part II

In the previous issue we discussed the beginnings of worship by Christians in and following the first century, and the eventual use of buildings used specifically for worship. We also saw a contemporary account of what second century worship was like.

Because the word was designed to be spread throughout the world (Mark 16:15), we can understand that not all nations, times and civilizations would have (or be able to have) buildings like we use today. Throughout countries even in modern times, because of economic or political considerations, Christians may meet in open-air concrete buildings (that is a usual location in Nigeria), in private residences (Romania is one country where Christians may not meet or teach publicly), or in secluded woods away from cities (China still forbids any unauthorized meetings).
Entire Issue of February 18, 2018


Differences in Worship - Then & Now

Part I

Christians enter an auditorium designed for the purpose, take a seat on a padded pew, chat among themselves and with visitors, settle down as the established time to worship occurs and announcements are presented. Then they sing, pray, take the Lord’s Supper, make a contribution, hear a sermon, sing an invitation song and are dismissed with a prayer.

With relatively minor variations, this is how Christians worship each Sunday. Since we present the argument that we should follow the Bible as it was revealed as late as the First Century A.D., it is natural that we think that the way we worship today is the way it has always been.

Not so.
Entire Issue of February 4, 2018


Sell Your Cloak and Buy a Sword?

(The following article was written by Wes McAdams, an evangelist living in Plano, Texas, who writes a religious blog at www.radicallychristian.com, and who discusses current issues through his articles. Since a shooting at a building used by a church of Christ in Tennessee last September, several congregations have tried to increase their physical security by means of everything from hiring security guards to installing attack-proof doors. This is, in part, a reasoned response to those actions.

Bro. McAdams focuses on the prophecy Jesus cited. In light of the September tragedy, we also need to think of the same prophecy and its meaning for us. There was not the sense of urgency among our brethren to create a fortress mentality when other church-related killings happened to denominational groups. But when the Tennessee event happened “too close to home” in terms of the name of the group attacked, it was somehow easier to foster a defensive posture. Let us determine that we will live according to God’s word and God’s will and God’s way.)

It’s time for us to resume our “Re-Examined” series by considering Luke 22:36, in which Jesus says, “Let the one who has no sword sell his cloak and buy one.” Many Christians use this passage as a proof-text for the use of deadly force in self-defense. But is that really what Jesus was talking about in this passage? Is Jesus commanding all of His disciples to arm themselves? Let’s take a look at Luke 22:36.)
Entire Issue of January 21, 2018


What We Don't Know

(This article is based on a recent Wednesday Bible class.)

The Bible teaches us about God, Jesus and how to return to a covenant relationship with Deity. Although the following subjects are not proof of how we can be saved, they do teach us a great deal – the Flood, about King Solomon, the various captivities of the Jewish people, and many other events.

The Bible does explain that not all events are covered within its pages. As one example, John writes in John 21:25: “And there are also many other things which Jesus did, which if they were written in detail, I suppose that even the world itself would not contain the books which were written.”
Entire Issue of January 7, 2018


Looking Ahead

We are taught to plan for the future – study for your schoolwork, put aside some money for retirement, set the coffee brewer to turn on just before we awake. Indeed, if we don’t plan for those secular things, our lives could well become chaotic.

The Bible has a different take on planning.
Entire Issue of December 17, 2017


Judging and Casting Stones

by Heath Rogers

  We live in a world that embraces tolerance. "Live and let live" seems to be the ruling spirit of our day. Our culture tells us that we can have and hold our own views, provided they don't condemn the views of other people. When Christians point out and object to the sin and immorality in the lives of other people, we are quickly reminded that we can't do that because our Bible says, "Judge not."

Indeed, Jesus did speak these words of warning to His disciples. Here is the entire quotation: "Judge not, that you be not judged. For with what judgment you judge, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured back to you,: (Matt. 7:12) A careful look at this passage shows that Jesus did not forbid His followers to make judgments about others. He warned them against making harsh or hypocritical judgments. He stated a general truth, that we will be judged according to the same standard that we use on others.
Entire Issue of December 3, 2017


The Sounds of Music

"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast,” according to English playwright William Congreve, who died almost 400 years ago. The precept lives on today; it also was an accurate concept for thousands of years before Congreve.

One form of music, singing, according to a scholarly paper from Lawrence University, is basic to man and predates spoken language. “The voice,” the paper continues, “is presumed to be the original musical instrument, and there is no human culture, no matter how remote or isolated, that does not sing.
Entire Issue of November 19, 2017


What's In A Name?

Everything and everyone has a name. We identify by names. “Paul” could be the boy in the neighborhood. “Mrs. Jones” may have been our fifth-grade teacher. “Exxon” may be the place where we buy gasoline.

Using names is a necessary and convenient method of identification. Imagine, instead of saying “tree,” we would always be forced to say “that large plant with a whole bunch of flat green things all over it.” Or, rather than saying “Paul,” we had to stretch our conversation with “that red-headed boy who wears blue jeans and a sweater and lives four houses down.”
Entire Issue of October 29, 2017


Benevolence

With current issues of sending aid to victims of recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida, it may be appropriate to review what the Bible says about taking care of others.

The subject involves both those who benefit and how money or donations are acquired.
Entire Issue of October 15, 2017


Trinity

If you have been a member of the Lord’s church for any length of time or have been associated with any number of denominations, you probably have been taught that the Godhead is made up of three persons – God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit. The Godhead also is usually referred to as the Trinity.

Even if you firmly believe that the Trinity exists in the form stated above, you may have trouble understanding what it is. You are not alone.
Entire Issue of October 1, 2017


Are You Beautiful?

by Rick Liggin

  Modesty aside, do you think you're attractive? Do you think you're beautiful, if you're a woman, or handsome, if you're a man? Are you concerned about being beautiful, staying beautiful, and being around beautiful (handsome) people? No one wants to be ugly. All of us, to some degree, want to be beautiful or handsome...or, at least, attractive. But how do you determine who is or who is not beautiful? How do you define beauty and attractiveness? For many people, and especially for men, attractiveness and beauty are judged purely by what we see physically—by what a person looks like; by his or her outward appearance.

This was Samson's problem!
Entire Issue of September 17, 2017


Angels

What does an angel look like? What does an angel do? Are there guardian angels?

What are angels?

We all have mental images of what angels look like. Even though we may not believe in some of the concepts the world ascribes to these heavenly beings, our mind’s eye sees them as dressed in flowing white robes, with long golden hair and white feathered wings on their backs. We see them as either male or female. If you’re a movie fan, you may see them as depicted in Angels in the Outfield, where archangel Christopher Lloyd directs a number of them in assisting the hapless Los Angeles Angels (after all, what other team would they help?).

Apart from Hollywood depictions, artists and sculptors have created enough works of art based on the Bible that we see many images of angels hovering over the baby Jesus in the manger, or walking up and down a ladder in Jacob's dream, or poised at the entrance to Jesus' tomb the day he rose from the grave.

We can't help but form that impression of an angel because that's what the world wants us to see. And the Bible gives us little, if any, detailed picture of how they appeared to men.
Entire Issue of September 3, 2017


Parallel Words

A single word may have different meanings. For instance, “stick” may mean a long, thin piece of wood. Or it may mean adhering to another surface, or a tackle in football. The meaning depends on the context of the discussion.

We all recognize that the same word may have different meanings, and that’s important for us to understand what others are talking about. When we misunderstand the meaning by the speaker, we misunderstand what he is trying to tell us.

So valuable conversations are two-way streets: The speaker must be clear in the thought he is trying to convey, and the listener must pay attention without misinterpreting what he hears.

The New Testament uses two words in particular to teach important lessons: first, to anyone who will listen; and, second, to Christians who need to understand the roles they play among believers.
Entire Issue of August 20, 2017


Training Your Child

by Morris Fraser

  Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it. Proverbs 22:6 KJV

Whoever spares the rod hates their children, but the one who loves their children is careful to discipline them. Proverbs 13:24, KJV

Withhold not correction from the child: for if thou beatest him with the rod, he shall not die. Proverbs 23:13 KJV (see also Proverbs 23:14, Proverbs 29:15)

And, ye fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. Ephesians 6:4 KJV (see also Colossians 3:21)

The first verse above is the goal of raising children. The second and third are the methods. The fourth warns of poor discipline.
Entire Issue of August 6, 2017


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